Category Babies

Speech (sound) disorders
Babies

Speech (sound) disorders

About speech and speech development Speech is the ability to use your lips, tongue and other parts of your mouth to produce sounds. For speech, children need to understand different sounds and the rules for putting those sounds together in their own language. Most children master the following sounds at the following ages: around 3 years : b, p, m, n, h, d, k, g, ng (sing), t, w, f, y around 4-5 years : f, sh, zh, ch, j, s, and cluster sounds tw, kw, gl, bl around 6 years : l, r, v, ng, and cluster sounds pl, kl, kr, fl, tr, st, dr, br, fr, gr, sn, sk, sw, sp, str, spl around 7-8 years : th, z, and cluster sounds sm, sl, thr, skw, spr, skr.

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Babies

Weaning: stopping breastfeeding

What is weaning? Weaning means stopping breastfeeding . Weaning is the end of breastfeeding, when your baby no longer has any breastmilk. Weaning starts when your baby has any food other than breastmilk at times during the day, and weaning ends when she no longer has any breastmilk. You might decide to stop breastfeeding when or before your baby reaches 6 or 12 months.
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Babies

Language delay

What is a language delay? A language delay is when children have speaking and understanding difficulties that are unusual for their age. These might be difficulties with: saying first words or learning words putting words together to make sentences building vocabulary understanding words or sentences.
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Babies

9-10 months: baby development

Baby development at 9-10 months: what's happening Babbling, babbling, babbling - you'll hear lots of this from your baby as he gets closer to saying his first meaningful words. He might even say 'dada' or 'mama' and know what these words mean. If he's an early talker, he might be using 1-2 words already.
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Babies

6-7 months: baby development

Baby development at 6-7 months: what's happening This is an exciting time for your baby. Her imagination comes alive now. She's also better at remembering things, like her favourite people, toys and books. Your baby's emotions keep developing. Baby will let you know when he's happy and sad and can also tell how you're feeling by your tone of voice and the look on your face.
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Babies

Speech (sound) disorders

About speech and speech development Speech is the ability to use your lips, tongue and other parts of your mouth to produce sounds. For speech, children need to understand different sounds and the rules for putting those sounds together in their own language. Most children master the following sounds at the following ages: around 3 years : b, p, m, n, h, d, k, g, ng (sing), t, w, f, y around 4-5 years : f, sh, zh, ch, j, s, and cluster sounds tw, kw, gl, bl around 6 years : l, r, v, ng, and cluster sounds pl, kl, kr, fl, tr, st, dr, br, fr, gr, sn, sk, sw, sp, str, spl around 7-8 years : th, z, and cluster sounds sm, sl, thr, skw, spr, skr.
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Babies

Multilingual and bilingual children: benefits and challenges

Benefits of raising multilingual and bilingual children Raising multilingual or bilingual children is good not only for your children, but also for your family and your community. Children: benefits of multilingualism and bilingualism For children, speaking more than one language is often linked to: better academic results - this is because multilingual or bilingual children can often concentrate better, are better at solving problems, understand language structures better, and are better at multitasking more diverse and interesting career opportunities later in life.
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Babies

Child growth charts

About child growth Children's growth is a sign of their overall health and development. All babies and children grow at different rates, and there's a big range when it comes to 'normal'. Your child's growth is unique for him, and usually follows a pattern that's right for him. At home with your baby , you'll know whether she's growing.
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Babies

Bonding and attachment: babies

About bonding and attachment with babies Your bond with and your attachment to your baby is about the things you do together, and the way you make your baby feel. These things are vital for your baby's development . For example, bonding is about things like: responding to your baby's needs for food, sleep, clean nappies and so on showing him warmth and love playing with him talking, reading or singing to him smiling, touching or cuddling him.
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Babies

8-9 months: baby development

Baby development at 8-9 months: what's happening Babbling, clapping hands, crawling, pulling up to stand - there's a lot happening for your baby. At this age, your baby is having a growth spurt in his brain . This improves his memory and you might notice him forming stronger attachments to his favourite people, toys and books.
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Babies

Talking with babies and toddlers: how to do it and why

Talking with babies and toddlers: why more talk is better Talking with your baby or toddler can help his language and communication development. The more you talk with your baby or toddler, the better. This is because parents who talk a lot to their young children use lots of different sounds and words.
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Babies

3-4 months: baby development

Baby development at 3-4 months: what's happening Your baby is busy learning about emotions and communication. She's starting to link what you say to your facial expressions. She loves your face, but she might find new faces really interesting too. She also knows your voice and can turn her head to you when she hears you.
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Babies

4-5 months: baby development

Baby development at 4-5 months: what's happening Over his first few months, your baby has learned to know your voice , remember what you look like and understand that you respond when he needs you. At about five months old, he's starting to form a stronger attachment to you. He's also got to know other close family members and carers well, and understands who they are.
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Babies

Adapting family rituals

Why family rituals might change As your children get older, or when things change a lot, some family rituals might need to change too. Maybe your son no longer wants to be kissed goodbye in the schoolyard or your daughter wants to read her own bedtime stories. Bedtime could be getting later and later as your child gets older, or you might be about to have another baby.
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Babies

Family rituals: what are they?

Family rituals: what are they? Rituals are things that only your family does . Rituals help you say, 'This is who we are and what we value'. You might not even realise that you have rituals, but even a special song at bath time is a ritual. Some rituals might have been handed down from your grandparents or other relatives , like always opening Christmas crackers with the person on your left, or going to yum cha on Sunday mornings, or having chocolate ice-cream on Friday night.
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Babies

Travel with children by car, plane, bus and train

Travelling with kids by car It can help to keep the things you and your child need for the journey within easy reach - for example, snacks, water bottles, wipes and toys. For long car trips, plan regular stops so everyone can get out of the car and have a stretch. This includes babies, who can roll around on a rug on the ground.
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Babies

Family routines: how and why they work

Routines: the basics Routines are how families organise themselves to get things done, spend time together and have fun. Every family has its own unique routines. Routines help family members know who should do what, when, in what order and how often. For example, your family might have: daily routines for work and school mornings, bath time, bedtime, mealtimes, greetings and goodbyes weekly routines for housework, like washing and cleaning other routines involving holidays and extended family get-togethers.
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Babies

Swimming pool hygiene

Swimming pool water and illness Most swimming pools are clean. But sometimes, particularly if a pool is very busy or hasn't been properly treated with pool chemicals, germs can multiply. Germs in swimming pools can cause illnesses like infections of the ear, eye, skin and chest, as well as gastroenteritis .
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Babies

Dressing your baby

Choosing baby clothes Babies grow out of clothes very quickly, so you don't need to buy lots of any one item. For daytime baby clothes , try to buy or borrow things that are slightly too large, because your baby will get more wear out of them. For sleepwear , look for close-fitting things with low fire hazard labels.
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Babies

Breastfeeding and travelling

Breastfeeding and travel by plane Sometimes babies feel pain in their ears when planes are taking off and landing. Breastfeeding during take-off and landing can help to ease your baby's discomfort. Your baby must wear an infant seatbelt while you breastfeed. If you're planning to carry expressed breastmilk onto the plane, check with the airline beforehand about any restrictions on carrying liquids.
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Babies

Going to hospital: planning ahead for children and teenagers

Going to hospital: why planning helps You can't always plan for hospital visits, but if you do know when your child is going to hospital, planning can make a big difference. Planning for your child's hospital stay: reduces anxiety, worry and stress for you and your child helps your child know what to expect involves your child and helps her feel more in control.
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